Leçon 8: Que suis-je? Un jeu fait maison pour travailler le vocabulaire

P’tits choux, la semaine passée j’ai ressorti mes crayons de couleur pour vous concocter un petit jeu facile mais très efficace pour travailler le vocabulaire. Je suis sûre qu’on peut trouver ce genre de cartes de jeu dans le commerce, mais si on a le temps et l’envie il est aussi très divertissant de les faire soi-même.

 

 

So this is all homemade. Quite cute, right? The cards are 6X4cm, “laminated” with glossy adhesive tape. So far I’ve made 72 of them but I’m planning to add to the stack little by little.

 

 

The game is simple. Lay the deck of cards on the table, blank side up. One player takes a card and tries to describe what it represents, without gestures. If someone guesses the word, it’s a win. Trying to describe something is a very good exercise, and not always easy. I think you’ll have fun with this game, and of course you can come up with your own variations.

Que diriez-vous d’en faire une une deux?

Alors…. je suis préparée avec des légumes, je suis surtout appréciée par un jour d’hiver frileux mais on peut me manger chaude ou froide. Que suis-je?
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Une soupe, bravo!

 

 

 

On continue?

Alors…. je suis un vêtement, je suis fait avec de la laine et on m’enroule autour du cou pour donner chaud. Que suis-je?
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Oui, c’est bien une écharpe, bravo!

 

 

 

Une autre encore…

Donc…. je suis un objet en métal, pas très grand, qui peut tenir dans la poche. On peut s’en servir pour ouvrir ou fermer un tiroir ou une porte par exemple. Je ne peut pas fonctionner sans serrure. Que suis-je?
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Une clé, bien joué!

 

 

 

Et une petite dernière:

Bon…. nous sommes faites de verre équipé de montures en plastic ou en métal, et on nous porte sur le nez pour corriger la vue. Que sommes-nous?
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Oui super, des lunettes!

 

 

 

J’espère que ça vous a plu! À bientôt little chops!

A few thoughts about language learning techniques

I never gave much thought to language learning techniques. I learned German at school when I was very young and as far as I remember it was a very smooth process. I started learning English at middle school and ended up using it on a daily basis at work, becoming naturally fluent without much effort involved. I learned Italian when I was living in Italy just by listening to people talking. Pretty cool, right?

This year, at the age of 43 I started learning Japanese (after having lived in the country for 13 years, I know, my bad…). I went to Japanese school full-time for 6 months, and studied a lot on my own as well. I was basically learning Japanese from morning to evening. And in a way I still do. While I acquired solid grammatical bases and vocabulary I found myself to be repeatedly frustrated over my lack of progress with conversation. I felt that I had learned so much, piled up so much knowledge in my head, and yet I was unable to express myself. Why?

I do think that it is important to go through grammar basics even if it might feel boring. I’m very grateful to my teachers for their dedication and patience. Without grammar and vocabulary one cannot expect to progress, that’s just the way it is, one needs building blocks to build anything. Repetition is also important in my view. And I don’t mean just repeating a word (or entire sections, for that matter) two or three times. I mean going back to them over and over again. After a day, a week, two weeks, a month…. This will consolidate the acquired knowledge and burn little pathways of fluency in the alleys of your brain. I’m not kidding, it will!

Accumulating building blocks is of course essential. But then, what to do with them? When I was studying Japanese there were all these bits and pieces I knew by heart because that’s the way they were written in the textbook. For example, I knew how to say “this is a pen”. That path was well engraved in my brain because I acquired it through extensive studying, repetition, and I was therefore able to use that sentence. But when I had a conversation with someone and wanted to say “this is my pen”, or “this is Luca’s pen”, or “this was his pen”, or “this is not my pen”, I was in trouble. Why? Because I didn’t practice those pathways, it’s as simple as that.

That’s why I want to teach you to build as many collateral pathways as possible. It can be done starting from a very simple sentence, coming up with as many variations as you can, and practicing repeating them. We will do this with the help of texts from Le Petit Prince (Antoine de Saint-Exupéry) and Voyage En France (Sylvie Lainé). I’m very much looking forward to meeting you on the road, mes petits choux, à bientôt!

 

 

 

Bienvenue!

Je suis très heureuse de vous présenter Le Cartable du Petit Prince, un site créé pour tous ceux qui veulent se lancer dans l’aventure qu’est l’apprentissage de la langue Française.

Les textes de référence que j’utiliserai au cours des articles de blog sont les suivants:

 

  • Easy French Step-by-Step (Myrna Bell Rochester)

 

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  • Le Petit Prince (Antoine de Saint-Exupéry)

 

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  • Voyage en France – An Easy French Story (Sylvie Lainé)

 

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Suivez-moi mes petits choux….