Leçon 8: Que suis-je? Un jeu fait maison pour travailler le vocabulaire

P’tits choux, la semaine passée j’ai ressorti mes crayons de couleur pour vous concocter un petit jeu facile mais très efficace pour travailler le vocabulaire. Je suis sûre qu’on peut trouver ce genre de cartes de jeu dans le commerce, mais si on a le temps et l’envie il est aussi très divertissant de les faire soi-même.

 

 

So this is all homemade. Quite cute, right? The cards are 6X4cm, “laminated” with glossy adhesive tape. So far I’ve made 72 of them but I’m planning to add to the stack little by little.

 

 

The game is simple. Lay the deck of cards on the table, blank side up. One player takes a card and tries to describe what it represents, without gestures. If someone guesses the word, it’s a win. Trying to describe something is a very good exercise, and not always easy. I think you’ll have fun with this game, and of course you can come up with your own variations.

Que diriez-vous d’en faire une une deux?

Alors…. je suis préparée avec des légumes, je suis surtout appréciée par un jour d’hiver frileux mais on peut me manger chaude ou froide. Que suis-je?
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

 

Une soupe, bravo!

 

 

 

On continue?

Alors…. je suis un vêtement, je suis fait avec de la laine et on m’enroule autour du cou pour donner chaud. Que suis-je?
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

 

Oui, c’est bien une écharpe, bravo!

 

 

 

Une autre encore…

Donc…. je suis un objet en métal, pas très grand, qui peut tenir dans la poche. On peut s’en servir pour ouvrir ou fermer un tiroir ou une porte par exemple. Je ne peut pas fonctionner sans serrure. Que suis-je?
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

 

Une clé, bien joué!

 

 

 

Et une petite dernière:

Bon…. nous sommes faites de verre équipé de montures en plastic ou en métal, et on nous porte sur le nez pour corriger la vue. Que sommes-nous?
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.
.

 

Oui super, des lunettes!

 

 

 

J’espère que ça vous a plu! À bientôt little chops!

Leçon 2: Le Petit Prince, Chapitre 1

Bonjour mes petits choux, aujourd’hui on va commencer à lire Le Petit Prince, vous vous réjouissez?
Below you will find the text for chapter 1, along with audio files so you can practice your pronunciation. Let’s go!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Vocabulary and grammar points, with variations

un livre   –   a book
lire des livres  –  to read books
un auteur  –  an author
un écrivain  –   a writer
un dessin  –  a drawing
un chef-d’oeuvre   –  a masterpiece
les grandes personnes  –  grown ups
un serpent boa   –  boa constrictor
un chapeau  –  a hat
abandonner   –  to give up
lucide  –   quelqu’un qui voit les choses clairement, qui comprend
raisonnable  –   adulte, sérieux, intelligent, réfléchi

j’aime lire des romans policiers / des magazines de mode / des mangas…
I like to read crime novels / fashion magazines / manga…

je lis beaucoup / je ne lis pas beaucoup   –  I read a lot / I don’t read much
je lis souvent / je ne lis pas souvent  –  I often read / I don’t read very often

je lis dans le train / I read in the train

lorsque j’avais 6 ans / quand j’avais 6 ans  –  when I was 6 years old
—> try to build different sentences with the same pattern:
—> quand mon frère avait 6 ans / quand mes enfants avaient 6 ans / quand j’avais 15 ans

ils ne peuvent plus bouger  –  they can’t move anymore
—> je ne peux plus bouger / elle ne peut plus bouger / le chien ne peut plus bouger

j’ai beaucoup réfléchi / j’ai réfléchi pendant longtemps  –  I thought about it at length

j’ai (enfin) réussi à…. –  I (finally) managed to…
—> j’ai enfin réussi mon examen / j’ai réussi à comprendre….

j’ai montré mon dessin à…  –  I showed my drawing to
je voudrais vous montrer mon dessin  –  I would like to show you my drawing
est-ce que je peux vous montrer…?   –   can I show you…?

j’ai demandé aux grandes personnes   –   I asked grown ups
je leur ai demandé si…  –   I asked them wether….

j’aimerais poser une question   –   I would like to ask a question
—>
j’aimerais une glace / j’aimerais aller au cinéma / j’aimerais dormir / j’aimerais revenir

elles ont besoin d’explications  –  they need to be explained
—> il a besoin d’argent / elle a besoin de lui / j’ai besoin de me reposer
—> je n’ai pas besoin de ça / tu n’as pas besoin de payer

je m’intéresse à la géographie / au sport / à la mode / à la cuisine  –  I’m interested in…

je suis découragé / j’ai été découragé par…  –  I got discouraged by…

les grandes personnes ne comprennent jamais  –  grown ups never understand
je ne comprends pas / il ne comprend rien / mon père ne comprend pas

ça n’a pas amélioré mon opinion  –  it didn’t improve my opinion of it

je me suis amélioré en Français / mon Français s’est beaucoup amélioré
I got better at French / my french improved a lot

je voulais savoir si…  –  I wanted to know if…
—->

Did you understand the point of coming up with variations for a given sentence? It will greatly improve the range of expressions you’ll be able to use in conversations, and you will feel more comfortable in no time. With practice of course.

 

 

And now a few questions  –  Quelques questions au sujet du texte

  • L’auteur nous raconte une anecdote de son enfance. Quel age avait-il à l’époque?
  • L’auteur aimait bien les livres quand it était petit. Vrai ou faux?
  • Qu’a vu l’auteur dans le livre “Histoires Vécues” quand it était petit?
  • L’auteur aimait bien dessiner quand il était petit. Vrai ou faux?
  • Que représente le premier dessin de l’auteur, d’après lui?
  • Que représente le premier dessin de l’auteur, d’après les adultes?
  • Que représente le deuxième dessin de l’auteur?
  • Pourquoi l’auteur a-t-il fait un deuxième dessin?
  • Qu’on pensé les grandes personnes des dessins de l’auteur?
  • Les grandes personnes ont encourgé l’auteur à continuer de dessiner. Vrai ou faux?
  • Quel est le métier de l’auteur?
  • L’auteur adulte a gardé son dessin de serpent boa. Vrai ou faux?
  • Que pense l’auteur des adultes?

Try to answer as best you can, and then listen to the audio to compare your answers with mine. Of course answers may vary, so don’t get discouraged if I replied something different from you, you might still be right! And by the way, otsukare if you managed to get through the first chapter, great job petits choux!

 

A few thoughts about language learning techniques

I never gave much thought to language learning techniques. I learned German at school when I was very young and as far as I remember it was a very smooth process. I started learning English at middle school and ended up using it on a daily basis at work, becoming naturally fluent without much effort involved. I learned Italian when I was living in Italy just by listening to people talking. Pretty cool, right?

This year, at the age of 43 I started learning Japanese (after having lived in the country for 13 years, I know, my bad…). I went to Japanese school full-time for 6 months, and studied a lot on my own as well. I was basically learning Japanese from morning to evening. And in a way I still do. While I acquired solid grammatical bases and vocabulary I found myself to be repeatedly frustrated over my lack of progress with conversation. I felt that I had learned so much, piled up so much knowledge in my head, and yet I was unable to express myself. Why?

I do think that it is important to go through grammar basics even if it might feel boring. I’m very grateful to my teachers for their dedication and patience. Without grammar and vocabulary one cannot expect to progress, that’s just the way it is, one needs building blocks to build anything. Repetition is also important in my view. And I don’t mean just repeating a word (or entire sections, for that matter) two or three times. I mean going back to them over and over again. After a day, a week, two weeks, a month…. This will consolidate the acquired knowledge and burn little pathways of fluency in the alleys of your brain. I’m not kidding, it will!

Accumulating building blocks is of course essential. But then, what to do with them? When I was studying Japanese there were all these bits and pieces I knew by heart because that’s the way they were written in the textbook. For example, I knew how to say “this is a pen”. That path was well engraved in my brain because I acquired it through extensive studying, repetition, and I was therefore able to use that sentence. But when I had a conversation with someone and wanted to say “this is my pen”, or “this is Luca’s pen”, or “this was his pen”, or “this is not my pen”, I was in trouble. Why? Because I didn’t practice those pathways, it’s as simple as that.

That’s why I want to teach you to build as many collateral pathways as possible. It can be done starting from a very simple sentence, coming up with as many variations as you can, and practicing repeating them. We will do this with the help of texts from Le Petit Prince (Antoine de Saint-Exupéry) and Voyage En France (Sylvie Lainé). I’m very much looking forward to meeting you on the road, mes petits choux, à bientôt!